Thursday, 1 March 2012

The Meritorious Men of the 1920s

To continue our look at Hall of Fame inductees versus TPAK results (previously discussed: the 1910s, 1900s, and the earliest years), we go on to the 1920s.

In an unsurprising development, the Hall of Fame voters continue to agree with the TPAK results to a greater degree as time goes on, and as they get into players they had the greatest chance of being directly familiar with. In the case of players whose careers were centred in the 1920s (see table below), we find the top 17 players (and 19 of the top 21) have actually been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The only ones that have been missed out are Carson Cooper and Corb Denneny.

Carson "Shovel-Shot" Cooper was a dominant scorer for the Hamilton Tigers of the OHA in the early 1920s, leading his senior league in goals three times and points twice; in 1923/24 he scored 33 goals in 10 games and finished his OHA career with 108 goals in 55 games. Signed by the Boston Bruins in November 1924, it didn't take long for Cooper to make an impact in the NHL. In 1925/26, he finished second in the league in goals, behind only the legendary Nels Stewart, and was third in points. In 1928/29 he was in Detroit (and 32 years old), and though his raw numbers were less impressive (due to the scoring environment of the league at that time), he was third in goals and tied for third in points.

Cooper is found deserving of the Hall because his OHA numbers are not ignored. He had only two NHL seasons among the best scorers, but it must be remembered that he didn't play his first professional game until the age of 27. This means his NHL career was played mostly in the decline phase of his career. Point Allocation, however, doesn't pretend that the NHL is the only league that matters at this time of the game's history. So Cooper's thoroughly impressive OHA production is given the full credit it deserves.

Corb Denneny, lesser-known than his Hall-of-Fame brother Cy, had a 19-year senior/professional career. Though never the best centre in his league, his consistency and longevity are what earns him Hall-of-Fame-level merit here. Being just below the very best for an extended period of time is quite remarkable in itself.

I see every player listed on the table below as deserving of being in the Hall of Fame, based on their TPAK results. And speaking of longevity, check out George Hainsworth's career. He managed 1611 effective games played, which is the equivalent of playing a full 80-game schedule for 20 seasons, plus a bit. Hainsworth played his first senior hockey in the OHA (at the age of 17) in 1912/13, a full 11 years before he would play his first professional game. After 11 seasons of senior-level amateur hockey (all but one of which was played in Berlin, later Kitchener), he began a 14-year major-pro career, retiring at the age of 41. Like Cooper, Hainsworth gets credit for this time in the OHA, which was a high-quality league at the time and cannot simply be ignored because it was not professional.
  
RankPlayerPosGPTPAKScoreHall?
1MORENZ, Howie511164.67124.8Yes
2HAINSWORTH, GeorgeG16113.84116.9Yes
3COOK, Bill713414.08116.7Yes
4BOUCHER, Buck313044.16112.9Yes
5JOLIAT, Aurel613283.86109.7Yes
6NIGHBOR, Frank512863.77109.3Yes
7BENEDICT, ClintG13193.95108.6Yes
8CONACHER, Lionel311774.08105.9Yes
9OLIVER, Harry7513323.58105.3Yes
10CLANCY, King311854.04102.7Yes
11MacKAY, Mickey5412893.5399.3Yes
12DENNENY, Cy612413.6398.0Yes
13NOBLE, Reg3513823.4596.2Yes
14GARDINER, Herb39463.7594.7Yes
15KEATS, Duke510013.5790.4Yes
16SIMPSON, Joe311933.4290.2Yes
17DUTTON, Red312823.2990.1Yes
18COOPER, Carson710233.3888.5No
19DENNENY, Corb512673.0286.9No
20HAY, George69553.5085.8Yes
21CONNELL, AlecG7763.7385.2Yes

5 comments:

  1. Hi just here to share some info on the evolution of ice hockey.I’ve researched both american and canadian perspectives.Birthplace of early HOCKEY games took place on long pond windsor ns NEAR KINGS COLLEGE circa 1800.Ice hurley and other forms of break shins ,wicket cricket, ice bandy, shinny, field hockey,RUGBY,ICE LACROSSE,ETC were being combined. FULL SKATE BLADE was invented by a PHILADELPHIAN in 1848.Early pucks were carved out of wood by the mic mac indians 1860.The first hockey sticks were carved in lindsay ontario 1852 by alexander rutherford sr. First indoor AND semi organized game was 9 on 9 at the victoria skating rink montreal in 1875 by JAMES CRIEGHTON using previous HALIFAX RULES . FIRST ARTIFICIAL ICE RINK WAS CREATED BY WILLIAM NEWTON IN NEW YORK CITY 1870.FIRST INDOOR ARENA IN US WAS THE GREAT CHICAGO SKATING RINK 1860.EARLIEST KNOWN ARRIVAL OF GAME TO USA 1856 ST.PAUL’S SCHOOL CONCORD NH PLAYING SHINNY TO ICE FIELD HOCKEY TO ICE POLO. MONTREAL RULES OF HOCKEY USED BY JAMES CONOVER AT ST.PAUL NH 1880-81 .FIRST game to mention postions and play 7 on 7 WAS AT THE montreal winter carnival festival 1883.BURLINGTON VERMONT HOSTS THAT CARNIVAL IN 1886 AND PLAYED THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL MATCH(7 ON 7) BETWEEN MONTREAL HC AND THE LOCAL VAN NESS HOUSE CLUB.FIRST ORGANIZED LEAGUE 1886-1887 AMATEUR HOCKEY ASSOCIATION IN MONTREAL.1890-91 FIRST GOAL NETS WERE INVENTED FROM ICE POLO AT STORRS AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL NOW UCONN.EARLY GOALIE LIKE PADS WERE WORN SAME TIME THERE.FIRST PRO LEAGUE CREATED IN PORTAGE MICHIGAN 1904 IPHL LOCAL BUSINESS MAN JAMES DEE&CANADIAN DENTIST DOC GIBSON.FIRST HOCKEY PANTS 1896 DETROIT MEDICAL SCHOOL.MODERN GOALIE PADS DULUTH CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL CIRCA 1903-04 MAYBE EARLIER THERE.EARLY 6 ON 6 VERSION OF GAME WASHINGTON PARK BROOKLYN 1908 IN THE AAHL.BLOCKER INVENTION LORNE CHABOT CANADA 1920’S. NHL TRAPPER MIKE KARAKAS FROM AURORA MINNESOTA. LATE 1930’S.HELMET FRANK GOHEEN WHITE BEAR LAKE MINNESOTA 1910’S, 20’S PERIOD..CLARENCE ABEL(SAULT ST MARIE,MICHIGAN) FIRST US BORN PLAYER TO WIN STANLEY CUP 1928 RANGERS.FIRST PAIRING OF DEFENSE IN 1911,1912 PERIOD ALFRED WINSOR OF HARVARD. GEORGE OWEN AND WILLIAM CLAFLIN OF HARVARD INVENTS FULL 3 MAN LINE CHANGE IN 1923.FIRST GOALIE MASK JAQUES PLANTE 1959.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rather than just deleting this WALL OF TEXT I'll simply point out that the Long Pond claim is based on a brief passage in a work of fiction, a line said by a fictional character imagining what another fictional character might have done in his younger days. The book is often called a "memoir" but it is a novel. I won't bother going through this WALL in detail, but there's probably some more unsubstantiated claims in there as well.

      Delete
  2. Hi it's me again Jamie would like to share more info.
    In my findings I've came across some interesting information.
    In South Dakota around the early 1700's the Lakota Sioux were playing a stick-ball on ice game using bone skates.They would use a bent tree branch as a stick and buffalo shoulder bone as blade to glide on.Usually played along the village winter river ways.
    On tufts cove in Dartmouth Nova Scotia in 1749 the mikmaq natives were discovered playing a similar game to lacrosse but on ice.They used a hitting stick to strike the ball as well as a gliding stick to hold as they were using skates made of jawbone.
    In new York city in 1783 during the revolutionary war British loyalists living there played a game of ice Hurley on collect pond using steel pole skates.After the war and ended they came up to Halifax and brought their game with them.
    1788 is the conventional birthplace of hockey as kings college(renamed after king's college new York) opened up and there the students played the game on long pond.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The conventional birthplace is unsubstantiated, and moreover any claims that hockey originated in North America are pretty thoroughly refuted by "On the Origins of Hockey", a new book just released this past weekend. I'm posting a review of it tomorrow.

      Delete
  3. I know about this book and it's very interesting.I also have spoken with carl giden the coauthor and he told me about it before.
    Here are my articles.

    Ice Hockey Roots Deep in American Indian Culture by James ...
                                                        www.manataka.org/page2773.html

    Did  you know that the Iroquois native american tribe was reported to play one of the earliest hockey games in 1740?

    Probably played on bone skates on the St.Lawrence river in between Canada and the Us.


    An early form of hockey was first documented in 1740 when French explorers sailing up the St. Lawrence River observed Iroquois Indians hitting a hard ball with sticks and, as legend has it, punctuating their action with shouts of
    "Hogee'' (it hurts!).(1)

     French explorers in 1740 described a group of Iroquois playing a game with sticks and a ball on a frozen pond.(2)

    Early Canadian records state that the Iroquois Indians chased deer across the
    ice on bone skates.(3)

    Early explorers of North America were amazed to see members of the Iroquois nation gliding across frozen lakes and rivers on blades fashioned of bone.This suggests that they had been skating for quite a while, as do the many ancient
    bone-and-shoe combination that have been unearthed by archaeologists.(4)

    In Canada early French explorers copied the Iroquois Indians in the use of bone skates for hunting deer during the winter.(5)
    References:





    (1) Labor Relations in Professional Sports - Page 202
    books.google.ca/books?isbn=0865691371
    Robert C. Berry, ‎William B. Gould, ‎Paul D. Staudohar - 1986

    (2) Reading Tutor, Grades 4 - 8: Sports - Page 17
    books.google.ca/books?isbn=1580378854
    Cindy Barden - 2009

    (3) The Best of the Best in Figure Skating - Page 1983
    books.google.ca/books?isbn=0761313028
    Rachel Rutledge - 1998

    (4) The fine art of ice skating: an illustrated history and ... - Page 57
    books.google.ca/books?id=2SDwAAAAMAAJ
    Julia Whedon - 1988

    (5) Figure skating - Page 7
    books.google.ca/books?id=muhtAAAAMAAJ
    Elizabeth Van Steenwyk - 1976






    ReplyDelete

Hostgator promo codes